Lesson 8 - Checkmate Patterns in Chess: Specific Tandems Configuration

"You may learn much more from a game you lose than from a game you win. You will have to lose hundreds of games before becoming a good player."
- Jose Raul Capablanca

If you do not know what is a checkmate or if you need a refresh, I recommend that you go through the page introducing the checkmate before continuing.

In the previous pages, we studied different possibilities offered by pieces to deliver a checkmate. We saw basic mating patterns like the corridor mate, epaulette mate, smothered mate, the lethal kiss and we also studied some techniques to succeed in setting the right checkmating pattern against a lone king. You can now start applying these notions in your own games. However, in order to help you identify positions containing checkmating possibilities or to help you prevent from being caught, I am giving you several other mating patterns involving different pieces setup that we have not studied yet.

Bishop and Rook Tandem

Bishop and Rook Tandem Checkmate

Diagram 8.26

Bishop and Rook Tandem Checkmate

Diagram 8.27

Bishop and Rook Tandem Checkmate

Diagram 8.28

Bishop and Rook Tandem Checkmate

Diagram 8.29

Bishop and Rook Tandem Checkmate

Diagram 8.30
 

Bishop and Knight Tandem

Bishop and Knight Tandem Checkmate

Diagram 8.31

Bishop and Knight Tandem Checkmate

Diagram 8.32

Bishop and Knight Tandem Checkmate

Diagram 8.33

Bishop and Knight Tandem Checkmate

Diagram 8.34

Bishop and Knight Tandem Checkmate

Diagram 8.35
Bishop and Knight Tandem Checkmate

Diagram 8.36

Knight and Rook Tandem

Knight and Rook Tandem Checkmate

Diagram 8.37

Knight and Rook Tandem Checkmate

Diagram 8.38

Knight and Rook Tandem Checkmate

Diagram 8.39
Knight and Rook Tandem Checkmate

Diagram 8.40

Other Tandems

Checkmate by Two Rooks

Diagram 8.41 - Two Rooks
Checkmate by Two Bishops

Diagram 8.42 - Two Bishops

Let's continue the lesson with the next page on using checkmate threats to get an advantageonline chess tutorial.